Authorities thwart wine smuggling offer in Jeddah

DJEDDAH: More than 18 months after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, children around the world continue to face challenges caused by disruptions to their regular education and socialization. Parents, teachers, educational institutions and governments have continued to put the well-being of younger generations at the top of their priorities, and World Children’s Day celebrates their achievements.

World Children’s Day has been celebrated annually since 1954 and is celebrated on November 20. This year’s theme is ‘A Better Future for Every Child’ and aims to help children recover from the interruptions and learning losses of the pandemic, which experts say could have long-term repercussions on the child. children’s mental and physical well-being.

Hafsah Khalid, a 33-year-old Saudi teacher, told Arab News that children’s challenges during the pandemic have become much more complex due to the distractions inherent in home study and the fact that teachers have to put in much more effort. to get – and hold – their attention.

Another challenge was the involvement of parents. According to Khalid, many children would ask their mother or father to help them with schoolwork, leaving the children much more dependent on help from others than they should be. Khalid also believes the lack of in-person physical interaction affected children’s performance levels.

“I understand that parents wanted their children to have good grades, but I feel it disrupted our students’ ability to learn,” Khalid said. “Now it’s up to the staff to get them back to performance and that’s something that worries us the most. “

In October, the Saudi education ministry suspended primary schools until further notice, which meant that many students, parents and teachers had to return to online learning.

Asma Khan, a Pakistani mother of two young girls in Jeddah, said home schooling has been one of her toughest challenges as a mother.

“My daughter is extremely athletic and participated in all kinds of physical activity at school. Online education has been very difficult, ”Khan told Arab News. “It was my job to get her to sit in one place and focus while working remotely, so (my) work was doubled, because it wasn’t just homework, it was homework too. , extracurricular activities, housework and much more. “

Rafeef Mohammad, 35, a civil servant and mother of a six-year-old girl, shared a similar experience. She said she had to work on motivating her daughter to study while keeping her spirits up.

HIGHLIGHT

In October, the Saudi education ministry suspended primary schools until further notice, which meant that many students, parents and teachers had to return to online learning.

“We had to switch from physical activities to purely online activities, other than that we tried to do things at home and I’m not the most creative but we tried our best. However, that was not enough; it was not active and it was down most of the time, ”Mohammed said. “It was tiring.”

At first, she tried to find ways to help her daughter study and memorize as much as possible. But eventually, Mohammad said, she gave up. “She does what she can and I am proud of what she can accomplish given the major change in the learning process. If that’s his limit, then that’s it.

Both mothers agreed that going back to mainstream school would be difficult because their children got used to working from home.

FAST

World Children’s Day has been celebrated annually since 1954 and is celebrated on November 20. This year’s theme is “A Better Future for Every Child” and aims to help children recover from the interruptions and learning losses of the pandemic, which experts say could have long-term repercussions on the child. children’s mental and physical well-being.

“We have nurtured the children a certain narrative and it will be extremely difficult to bring them back to a physical classroom with students and a teacher who they physically interact with,” Mohammad said.

Khan said she tried to maintain some sort of discipline, helping her daughter with preparatory work and then supervising her during tests and exams, but not helping her. “I knew there would be this problem, so I never gave her the option to rely on me (to do her job for her),” she explained.

Mohammad said she asked her daughter to organize her homework before her classes and gradually become self-sufficient before she returned to school. Likewise, Khan said she made sure her daughter was not disturbed during school hours and learned to manage her resources properly.

Around the world, many governments and educational institutions have spared no effort to ensure that children can always receive a great education. Saudi Arabia is no exception. Platforms such as Madrasati (My School) were launched to facilitate the learning experience through videos, tutorials and notes, and children quickly adapted.

Majah Alsabea, an 11-year-old girl in sixth grade, told Arab News that she actually preferred her online classes to regular classes, but added: “I miss going to class and seeing my friends all. days.

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