Apple and margarine prices rise 20% as rising food inflation hits Britons’ pockets


Consumers’ pockets are expected to be hit harder as inflation spikes the prices of everyday groceries, from apples to sausages to margarine.

New data from the Office for National Statistics shows that the prices of some of the most basic products with which Britons fill their carts have skyrocketed in the past 12 months.

Apples and margarine both saw huge increases, both up 20%. A typical 500g jar now costs over £ 1.60, while a bag of apples is over £ 2.35.

As the cost of daily groceries continues to skyrocket, Britons are facing crisis from all corners as energy bills, oil prices and rising inflation continue to cripple the power of consumer purchase.

Families are now on the cusp of the biggest spending cut in nearly a decade, despite some supermarket bosses unsuccessfully trying to shield shoppers from the worst price hikes.

New data from the Office for National Statistics shows that the prices of some of the most basic products that Britons fill their carts with have skyrocketed in the past 12 months

Apples and margarine both saw huge increases, both up 20%.  A typical 500g jar will now cost over £ 1.60, while a bag of apples will cost £ 2.35.

Apples and margarine both saw huge increases, both up 20%. A typical 500g jar will now cost over £ 1.60, while a bag of apples will cost £ 2.35.

After a continued fall in food prices, food inflation fell from 0.3% in August to 0.8% in September, as retailers battled supply shortages and higher costs.

This means that a standard pack of pork sausages has gone from £ 4.87 to £ 5.16 per kilogram in the span of a month.

Meanwhile, pears soared 16% to £ 2.37, while a bag of apples hit £ 2.35 after rising by a fifth.

Prices are rising at the fastest rate in at least a quarter of a century, as companies pass the costs of labor, materials, transportation and energy on to consumers.

Price of pears soared to £ 2.37 (up 16%)

A standard pack of pork sausages has gone from £ 4.87 to £ 5.16 per kilogram in the span of a month

A standard pack of pork sausages went from £ 4.87 to £ 5.16 per kilogram in the span of a month, while pears soared to £ 2.37 (up 16%)

New data from the Office for National Statistics explains how soaring commodity prices led to an increase in the cost of living throughout 2021

New data from the Office for National Statistics explains how soaring commodity prices saw the cost of living rise throughout 2021

The average household has spent £ 277 per month on food expenses, but the latest inflation reading suggests it could rise to £ 285 per month this year.

MailOnline’s analysis of prices compared to March 2020 found that the cost of many staples had increased, including mushrooms, spring onions, cabbage, salmon, soup, kiwis, apples and mineral water.

Among the most significant price increases are eggs, sausages, soft drinks, fruit and bottled water.

The average price of a pint in a pub across the country could soon exceed £ 4, the ONS also said.

Experts warn that food inflation is expected to continue into the new year, exacerbating a period of woe for thousands of families.

Train tickets, phone and internet bills and other daily expenses also rise, while Boris Johnson’s health and social services tax means workers will have to pay an additional tax of 1.25 points percentage starting next year.

Investment group Shore Capital has warned that prices could climb as much as 6% until 2022.

Families are now on the verge of the biggest spending cuts in almost a decade, as bills and prices rise relentlessly with household bills set to rise by more than £ 1,500

Families are now on the verge of the biggest spending cuts in almost a decade, as bills and prices rise relentlessly with household bills set to rise by more than £ 1,500

News of surging food inflation comes amid a 'perfect storm' of price and tax hikes, as Britons already face crisis with soaring energy and gas bills

News of surging food inflation comes amid a ‘perfect storm’ of price and tax hikes, as Britons already face crisis with soaring energy and gas bills

Analysis of last year's price increases shows the cost of a used car has risen by over £ 1,600, a tank of fuel over £ 10 and the price of a pint of beer close to £ 4

Analysis of last year’s price increases shows the cost of a used car has risen by over £ 1,600, a tank of fuel over £ 10 and the price of a pint of beer close to £ 4

Clive Black, a research analyst at Shore Capital, told the Mirror: “Some vendors who have increased their prices this summer are already necessarily coming back more given inflationary forces.

“With the increasing demands of supply chains for animal welfare … safety, sustainability and welfare, in the years to come, buyers will have to pay more for their food. ”

Meanwhile, food wholesaler BidFood has warned it is facing “significant” supply pressures and struggling to recruit truck drivers, blaming the problems on the pandemic and Brexit.

Supermarkets should focus on transporting fresh produce rather than many dry goods due to the lack of carriers amid the shortage of truck drivers.

Earlier this year, pig farmers began slaughtering livestock amid warnings from food companies that drastic measures will hit key ingredients.

And meat industry executives say a lack of skilled butchers means slaughterhouses refuse to accept pigs for slaughter, resulting in fewer pork products and reduced choice.

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